Steamed Chicken and Chinese Sausage with Ng Ka Py 五加皮

Fragrant and Comforting
Ng Ka Py 五加皮 Meets Chinese Sausage Meets Chicken

Imperial Chinese Jade Censer Collected by Berthold Laufer

Imperial Chinese Jade Censer
Collected by Berthold Laufer

Ng Ka Py五加皮 has an affinity with Chinese Sausage with Mustard, served side by side.  But these ingredients can be combined together, as in this Cantonese dish:

Steamed Chicken and Chinese Sausage with Ng Ka Py

Chinese

Ingredients

1 tender Spring Chicken
2 Chinese Sausages
6 Black Chinese Mushrooms
2 teaspoons Cornstarch
2 tablespoons Chinese Wine, Shao Xing Jiu
½ tablespoon Ng Ka Py, or more or less, to taste, but not more than 2 tablespoons
½ teaspoon Salt
1 teaspoon Sesame Oil

Method

First wash the Mushrooms and soak in hot water for at least half an hour.

Meanwhile, clean the Chicken and dry it well with paper towels or a cloth.  Chop it into bite-size pieces, about 1½ by 2 inches, bones and all.  A heavy Chinese cleaver works well for this.

Cut the Chinese Sausages diagonally into sections about half an inch wise.

Set both these chopped ingredients aside.

After the Mushrooms have soaked at least half an hour and are tender, remove and discard the stems and slice the tops. Save a cup of the Water the Mushrooms have soaked in.

Next make a Mixture, combining the Shao Xing Wine, Ng Ka Py, Salt, Sesame Oil and Cornstarch, together with a cup of the Mushroom Water. Mix well together and mix with the Chicken pieces to coat them all over.

Next, put the Chicken bits in a shallow dish, like a soup bowl, top with the Chinese Sausage and Black Mushroom slices.

Put the dish in a steamer and steam over hot water for about 40 minutes until the Chicken and Sausage are tender. If you have a bamboo steamer, you could put this on top of a wok which has a couple inches of water in the bottom and steam it that way. After steaming is finished, the dish is ready to eat and is best as a hot dish.

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Chinese Tang Dynasty ceramics from Silk Road

Tang Dynasty Camel,
From the Oases, 8th Century

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