Ginger V

Drinkable Avatars of Ginger
Maugham’s Cocktail Revived

Let’s look at some of the — basically alcoholic — avatars of Ginger:

Ginger Wine

Ginger Wine got popular in England during the Georgian era and is still available today.  It traditionally comes in green bottles.  There are also a number of recipes for making your own.

Ginger Wine is not a typical grape wine, but usually an infusion made with Ginger root or dried Ginger and sugar.  Sometimes there are additional raisins or sultanas.

Ginger Vodka

Some bartenders make their own Ginger-infused vodka for use in drinks like Ginger Gimlets. It is sometimes available commercially, or you can make your own using a recipe available on the Internet. [2]

Ginger Liqueur Continue reading

Pomegranate

Traveler on the Silk Road
A Fruit with Its Own Restaurant, Book, and Cocktail

“In cups of azure some seeds are blood;
others are drops of gold.”  — André Gide [1]

The Restaurant: Pomegranate is said to be a native of Iran.  For many years a leading destination restaurant in Tokyo is named Zakuro, which means Pomegranate in Japanese. [2]

Pomegranates

Pomegranates

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Baked Alaska

The Emperor of Ice Cream
Celestial Chefs’ Invention

Baked Alaska frozen dessert

Baked Alaska

Did ancient Chinese chefs invent Baked Alaska? Trader Joe thinks so. [1]

In promoting a new peppermint Baked Alaska for the Christmas season, Continue reading

Ng Ka Py 五加皮

Steinbeck’s Tipple
Fu Manchu’s Magenta Martini

What kind of word consists of “Ng”? This is the Cantonese rendering of Northern Chinese “wu” the word for the numeral ‘5’. The Mandarin name of this drink is Wu Jya Pi, 五加皮  literally “Bark of Five Additions.” [1]

So  Ng Ka Py is the Cantonese name for a Chinese spirit or liqueur that might be an infusion of five kinds of fruit peel.  A sort of alcoholic Five-Spice Powder, perhaps? [2]

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Chinese Celery

Quote

The Stuff of Heroes’ Wreaths
Fragrant Swizzle Sticks

“A leafier, skinnier-stalked version of the familiar green head” — Mark Bittman

 

Chinese  Celery

Chinese Celery Plant

When you cook with Chinese Celery, you’re using he plant that ancient Greeks and Romans used to weave their heroes’ garlands. [1]

The Vegetable Itself: As the picture shows, Chinese Celery looks similar to Western Celery, but is smaller, with bright green leaves.  As Mark Bittman says, it is a “leafier, slimmer-stalked version of the familiar green.” Continue reading