Mussel Soup / ซุปหอยแมลงภู่

Mussels and Shrimp in Coconut nd Lime Broth

Cooking with Coconut Milk

Coconut Milk

This Thai-influenced Mussels Soup would make a light meal for four to six people and can be ready in about half an hour.  The Coconut Milk is key, and the whole recipe is typical Thai hot-sweet-sour-salty, all simultaneously  Continue reading

Salmon with Lemongrass, Curry and Coconut Milk

A Fusion Approach
Lemongrass, Curry and Coconut Meet

Salmon with Lemongrass, Curry and Coconut MilkThis Asian Fusion approach to poaching fresh wild Salmon  would work well with King, Coho, Sockeye, just about any Salmon.  It’s quick and easy and delicious, preserving and enhancing the natural flavors. This simple preparation is also another example of the many possible uses of Lemongrass.

 

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Curry Paste Philippine Style / Almuwasahin Paste

A Complex Curry Taste
Good with Dumplings and Stir-Fries

Belachn Shrimp Paste

Belachan, Shrimp Paste

his Filipino style Curry Paste is good with a lot of things, including Dumplings and stir-fry dishes, as well as blander presentations of Fish, Chicken and Shrimp. This recipe Continue reading

Prawns Clay Pot / Tôm nồi đất sét

Another Clay Pot
A Dish from the Mekong

Shrimp

Shrimp

Prawns Clay Pot is another of the various things you can do with Clay Pots, a Vietnamese favorite. Make it with Prawns or larger Shrimp, ideally Continue reading

Pork and Lemongrass Meatballs in Lettuce Cups

Lettuce Meats Pork
Meets Lemongrass and Fish Sauce — a Remarkable Combination

 

Lemongrass, spice from Southeast Asia

Lemongrass

Vietnamese cuisine includes several kinds of delicious Meatballs intended to be eaten rolled in Lettuce and drizzled with a Dipping Sauce. This recipe Continue reading

Hot and Sour Shrimp Soup – Tom Yam Gung

Delicate Citrusy Broth
Extremely Popular in Thailand

Thai Tom Yum Soup

Tom Yum Soup

Tom Yam Gung is a Thai classic, and extremely popular in Thailand.  Its delicate cirrusy broth goes down like velvet. Still, it should have enough Continue reading

Beef Brochettes

A Vietnamese Classic
Ideal for a Buffet Party

Cooking with Vietnamese Nuoc Mam Fish Sauce

Nuoc Mam/Fish Sauce

Reflecting the Vietnamese fondness for Beef, this Beef Brochette dish is a classic of Vietnamese cuisine.  It would be ideal for a larger buffet event, along with several other major dishes. It is intended to serve six to eight people, along with Continue reading

Fried Chicken with Lemongrass (Ga Xao Sa Ot)

Lemongrass Meets Cayenne Pepper
Caramelized Sugar Meets Fish Sauce

Cooking with lemongrass

Lemongrass

This classic Vietnamese dish demonstrates the classic use of Caramelized Sugar in Vietnamese cuisine, as well as the roles Lemongrass and moderate amounts of Hot Red Pepper can play. This dish serves about 8.  Recipe adapted from Bach Ngo. The use of Nuoc Mam or Fish Sauce is also typical.

Fried Chicken with Lemongrass and Cayenne Pepper

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Singapore Peanut Sauce

For Satay or Gado Gado
Galangal Mees Kemerie Meets Tamarind

Galangal, an important Southeast Asian spice

Galangal

Peanut Sauces are popular in Southeast Asian cuisines.  So, we have a Thai Peanut Sauce, and Indonesian Peanut Sauce, both of which might go with foods like Satay and salads like Gado Gado.

Singapore Cuisine has its own version of Peanut Sauce.  This is good with Satay and also can be used as a dressing for a Gado Gado salad.

This sauce takes about 10 minutes to prepare and about 15 minutes to cook. It makes about a cup and a half

Special ingredients include Galangal, Tamarind and Kemerie or Candlenuts, as well as Lemongrass.  The Candlenuts are sometimes difficult to find; Almonds can be substituted.

Peanut Sauce

Singapore

Ingredients:

Tamarind Juice, Thailand origin

Tamarind Juice

2 ounces Tamarind Pulp (may substitute Lime juice in a pinch)
2 cups Water
3 Kemerie (Candlenuts) — or could substitute Macadamia nuts or Almonds
½ ounce Galangal or 1½ teaspoons powdered Galangal
15 small dried Red Chilies
1 stalk Lemongrass
3 cloves Garlic
1 teaspoon Shrimp Paste
1 Shallot or 2 tablespoons minced Onions
½ cup Vegetable Oil

1 cup toasted unsalted Peanuts
¼ cup Sugar
½ teaspoon Rice Vinegar or Malt Vinegar
¾ teaspoon Salt

Method:

First, mix the Tamarind Pulp with Water and strain it through a fine sieve.  You can also use the more refined Tamarind Juice from Thailand.

Prepare the Peanuts, by shelling them, and powdering them finely.   Originally this would be done in a mortar and pestle.  A blender or food processor works fine.

You want to do the other minor preparation — crush the Candlenuts or Macadamia Nuts coarsely, blanch and skin the Almonds if that is what you are using.,

Soak the Red Chilies in warm water and drain off the excess water.  This could be done while preparing the Peanuts.

The Garlic or Shallots need to be peeled and then minced.

The Lemongrass should be smashed lightly; the side of a heavy cleaver works well for this.

When all the preliminary preparation is ready, put the Candlenuts or whatever nuts are used, the Galangal, Chilies, Lemongrass, Garlic, Shrimp Paste and Shallots into a grinder or blender.  Process until very fine.

Then heat the Oil in a large hot saucepan or wok until the Oil is also hot.  Then add the Nut mixture, dry, stirring constantly, until it is fragrant.  Stir in the Peanuts, strained Tamarind liquid, the Sugar, Vinegar and Salt.

Boil these gently, uncovered for about 15 minutes, stirring well while cooking.

Cool the sauce and allow the spices to infuse their fragrance into the Peanuts.

The sauce is served at room temperature, with Satay or Gado Gado salad. Recipe adapted from Violet Ooon.

Singapore - Skyline

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Laotian Cuisine

Galangal, Lemongrass and Fish Sauce
Duck and Sticky Rice

Cooking with lemongrass

Lemongrass

Land of a Million Elephants: Laos has been called the Land of a Million Elephants. Elephants are still there, but modern Laos may now be the the .Land of a Million Motorbikes.

Laos is the only landlocked country in Southeast Asia and is home to a Continue reading