Chicken Salad / 雞肉沙拉

Chinese Recipe Fusion Style
Quick and Easy Meal for Two

Chicken

Chicken

This Chinese style Chicken Salad is a quick and convenient meal for two with some Fusion notes.  It was adapted from a recipe created by Ken Hom in the 1980s.

Chicken Salad
雞肉沙拉

Chinese – Fusion

Ingredients:

Tomatoes, ingredient in Arroz a la Filipina

Tomatoes – Another Key Ingredient

2 whole Chicken Legs
½ teaspoon Asian Sesame Oil
Sal, Black Pepper to taste
3 tablespoons Peanut or other Vegetable Oil
4 cloves Garlic
1 tablespoon fresh Ginger root
1 medium Green Pepper cup Cherry Tomatoes cups cooked Elbow Noodles, tossed with
tablespoons Vegetable Oil

For the Salad:

1 tablespoon Rice Vinegar or White Wine Vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon style Mustard
¼ cup OliveOil
3 cups Romaine Leaves
Parsley sprigs for garnish

Method:

How to cook Asian dishes with Sesame Oil

Sesame Oil

Remove the skin from the Chicken Legs.  Cu the skin into strips.  Remove the meat from the bones and cut into strips.  Put the meat into a small bowl, add Sesame Oil, Salt and Pepper.

Smash and mince the Garlic.  Mince the Ginger root.  Remove the seeds from the Green Pepper and cut into thin strips.  Cut the Cherry Tomatoes in h alf. Prepare the Noodles and toss with the Oil and set aside.

Lay out the various other ingredients near the stove top.

When time to cook, heat a wok until very  hot. When the wok is hot, add 1 tablespoon of the Oil and heat until the Oil is hot but not smoking.  Put in the Chicken Skin and stir-fry until the skin is crisp and golden.  It will take about 5 minutes.   Remove from the wok with a slotted spoon, drain on paper and reserve.

Next pour off the fat from the wok.  Heat the wok again.  Add 2 tablespoons more Oil and heat the Oil.  Add the Garlic, Ginger and Chicken Leg meat.  Stir-fry until the Chicken is no longer pink, about 4 minutes.

Next add the Green Pepper and stir-fry until the Green Pepper is crisp but still tender.  It will take about 3 minutes. Next add the Cherry Tomatoes and cook until just heated through, maybe 30 seconds. Put the Noodles on a serving plate and top with the chicken mixture and keep warm.

For the Salad, mix the Vinegar and Mustard in the bottom of a serving bowl.  Whisk in the Olive Oil until smooth.  Add the Romaine leaves and toss to mix.  Put the crisp Chicken Skin bits on top.

To serve, arrange some of the Noodle-Chicken mixture and some of the Sa;ad side by side on individual plates and serve immediately.

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