Stir-Fried Snow Peas 清炒荷蘭豆

A Chinese Version
Snow Peas Meet Bamboo Meat Black Mushrooms

Snow PeasAnother approach to Snow Peas. Here’s a Chinese, actually a Southern, or Cantonese, approach to Snow Peas, which combines them very effectively with Bamboo and Black Mushrooms plus a touch of Ham.Although it’s a stir-fry, the braising time is a fraction of Continue reading

Snow Peas

Gregor Mendel’s Peas?
Crisp and Tender, Raw or Barely Cooked

Snow PeasUntil recently, Snow Peas were considered an exotic Oriental specialty in North America.  Now they are available most places at supermarkets and in frozen form around the year.

There is a question where this vegetable comes from: Some Japanese encyclopedias and cookbooks assert Continue reading

Snow Peas Simmered in Milk

A Fusion Touch

How to cook with Snow Peas

Snow Peas

Since Milk is not an ingredient in traditional Japanese cuisine, there is a touch of Fusion in this Japanese way of preparing Snow Peas.  The use of “exotic” Western and other Asian ingredients has now become pretty common in modern Japanese cuisine, so we may think of this dish as just Japanese, after all. Continue reading

Snow Peas

Ideal for Adding to Soups and Salads
Or This Way

Snow Peas are at their best in spring and early summer, and good to add to soups or salads, or cooked, in this classic Japanese style:

Snow Peas

Japanese

Ingredients

¾ pound Snow Peas
1 teaspoon Salt
1 tablespoon Sugar
3 tablespoons Dashi or Chicken Stock

Method:

First wash the Pea pods and drain them. Remove the very ends of  the pods and the strings, then sprinkle with a little salt,  Boil in hot water for a minute, then drain the pods, and rinse with cold water under a running tap.  A colander is convenient for this.

After draining off any surplus water, mix the Dashi stock with a little Sugar (you can use the powdered Hon Dashi if convenient and no fresh Dashi stock is available). Bring the liquid to a boil and add a pinch of Salt or as much as you like.

Put the Snow Peas into the hot stock and cook for 2 minutes, then remove with a slotted spoon and drain.  Let them set to cool.  Meanwhile, cook down the pan juices to thicken them and spoon over the Peas as a sauce.

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Fish Basket (Ca Gio Hoa)

Vietnamese Approach to Flounder
Special Kind of Fish Fry

Three Crabs Band Fish Sauce, Vietnam

Nuoc Mam

This is a spectacular presentation for whole Flounder. The Vietnamese recipe is adapted from Bach Ngo. This recipe would serve about 8 people.

Fish Basket

(Ca Gio Hoa)

Vietnamese

Ingredients:

1 whole Flounder, about 3 or 4 pounds Continue reading

Cambodian Cuisine

Rice, Fish and Edible Flowers
An Ancient Civilization, a Noble Cuisine

Angkor Wat

“The Cambodians have some two hundred different ways of describing rice of various kinds.” — Christopher Pym [1]

Cambodian cuisine, descended from the ancient Khmer society, is one of the world’s oldest cuisines. [2]

It is now in a period of revival and Continue reading

Vietnamese Cuisine

Fish Sauce, Nuoc Mam and Sea Ghost  Fingers
The National Dish Is a Soup — Even at Breakfast

“Only the French imposed their own cuisine upon their Asiatic possessions.” — David Dodge [1]

“He was not yet Ho Chi Minh. It was 1917 and he was Nguyen Ai Quoc and he was a pastry cook under the great Escoffier.” — Robert Olen Butler [2]

Cooking with Vietnamese Nuoc Mam Fish Sauce

Three Crabs Brand Fish Sauce

Vietnamese cooking is light and delicate, healthy, and remarkably varied. Its famous dishes can be very unusual and even have poetic names, like one for Crab Claws called Sea Ghost Fingers. Continue reading