Another Thai Omelet / ไข่เจียว

Found on Menus Throughout Thailand
Sriracha Meets Cilantro

“This omelet appears in one form er another everywhere in Thailand. And every local region has their own variation> — Nancy S. McDermott

Cooking Thai dishes with Tiparos fish saue

Fish Sauce

This omelet is not just for breakfast, but can appear any any time of day.  In the context of a Thai meal, it would be served to several people along with other dishes.  McDermott served as a Peace Corps volunteer to Thailand and later wrote a cookbook featuring regional dishes she learned in Thailand.  So  a staple of Thai cuisine.

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Thai Omelet/ ไข่เจียว

A Tast Thai Classic
On Menus Everywhere

Thai Omelet

Thai Omelet

This tasty Thai classic Omelet is a classic in home cooking and appears on menus throughout Thailand.  A standard in Thai cuisine. Here’s a classic simple version: Continue reading

Cabbage in Milk / 奶白菜

A Tang Exotic
Ham Meets Milk Meets White  Pepper

“There are no dairy products. Butter, milk and cheese are practically unknown in Chinese cooking.” — Gloria Bley Miller [1]

“Because vegetables are eaten daily at every meal, Chinese cooks have evolved countless ways of preparing them.” — Nina Froud [2]

Cooking Asian dishes with cabbage

Cabbage

And it’s cancer-fighting! But, since there are no dairy products in Chinese cooking, how does this Hong Kong classic Continue reading

Can Walnuts Stop Cancer?

Ellagic Acid Helps Combat Cancer
Benefits to Kidneys, Urinary Functions

Walnuts can certainly play a role in a healthy diet that helps prevent and even control the condition.

Walnuts are high in Continue reading

Ginger I

Tamil Time-Traveler
As Fundamental as Onions

“Fresh ginger is as fundamental to the Asian kitchen as onion is to European cuisine.” — Molly O’Neill

Ginger Flower

Ginger, like Rice, was an ancient Tamil time traveler around the Pacific Rim.  Ginger, which grows underground and has beautiful red and yellow flowers above ground, is one of the most important foods in Asian kitchens.  And it is healthy, too!

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Ginger

Tamil Time-Traveler
As Fundamental as Onions

“Fresh ginger is as fundamental to the Asian kitchen as onion is to European cuisine.” — Molly O’Neill

Ginger Flower

Ginger I – Ginger Basics: Ginger, like Rice, was an ancient Tamil time traveler around the Pacific Rim.  Ginger, which grows underground and has beautiful red and yellow flowers above ground, is one of the most important foods in Asian kitchens.  And Ginger is healthy, too!

Natives of South India: Linguistic detectives have found out that the names for Ginger in the Indo-European languages all come from ancient South Indian languages Continue reading

Sea Cucumbers/Beche-de-Mer/Namako/海鼠

Sea Grub or Sea Mice?
Solomon Islands Currency

beche de mer or sea cucumbers

Beche de Mer
Frozen, Chinese Origin

You see them in Asian markets.  They do look like cucumbers, and are typically about six inches long in the fresh state.  Sometimes they are sold dried.  The dried form is usually black and rock-hard, and only a few inches long.Despite the name, they are not a vegetable and are not related to cucumbers.  They are a kind of seafood.

A common name is Sea Cucumbers, from their shape, also Trepang, or Bêche de Mer, from the French word for “sea grub.” Continue reading

Litchi

The Honorable Concubine’s Favorite Fruit
First Food Shipped by Refrigerated Transport

“Eunuchs gallop up in continuous succession,
“Bearing delicacies for the Imperial kitchens.”
Tu Fu, “Ballad of Lovely Women” [1]

It was the eighth century.  The eunuchs were Imperial couriers, a kind of Chinese Pony Express.

Their saddlebags were crammed full of Continue reading

Ng Ka Py 五加皮

Steinbeck’s Tipple
Fu Manchu’s Magenta Martini

What kind of word consists of “Ng”? This is the Cantonese rendering of Northern Chinese “wu” the word for the numeral ‘5’. The Mandarin name of this drink is Wu Jya Pi, 五加皮  literally “Bark of Five Additions.” [1]

So  Ng Ka Py is the Cantonese name for a Chinese spirit or liqueur that might be an infusion of five kinds of fruit peel.  A sort of alcoholic Five-Spice Powder, perhaps? [2]

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